Do I have an Emergency with my pet?

Have you ever wondered if you have an Emergency and needs you to seek emergency care for your pet?  Here are a few emergencies that will need you to get to the nearest emergency clinic ASAP.  ANY concern about your pet’s health warrants, at minimum, a call to our office.  718-728-2822

  • Your pet isn’t breathing or you can’t feel a heartbeat.
  • Your pet is unconscious and won’t wake up.
  • Your pet has been vomiting or has had severe diarrhea for more than 24 hours, or she is vomiting blood.
  • You suspect any broken bones, lameness or inability to move leg(s).
  • Your pet is having trouble breathing or has something stuck in her throat.
  • Your pet has had or is having a seizure.
  • Your pet is bleeding from the eyes, nose, mouth or rectum, or there is blood in her urine or feces.
  • You think your pet might have ingested something toxic, Common pet toxinsinclude but are not limited to:
    • Rat poisons (D-con)
    • Chocolate
    • Prescription, over the counter or illegal drugs (BRING THE CONTAINER WITH YOU)
    • Artificial sweeteners (e.g. xylitol)
    • Nicotine
    • Household cleaners.
    • Antifreeze
    • Certain household plants (e.g. Easter lillies)
    • Any kind of medication that wasn’t prescribed.
    • Please bring the ingested product if possible with you.
    • Your pet, particularly your male cat, is straining to urinate, or is unable to.
    • Your pet shows signs of extreme pain, such as whining, shaking, and refusing to socialize.
    • Your pet collapses or suddenly can’t stand up.
    • Your pet begins bumping into things or suddenly becomes disoriented.
    • You can see irritation or injury to your pet’s eyes, or she suddenly seems to become blind.
    • Your pet’s abdomen is swollen and hard to the touch, and/or she’s gagging and trying to vomit.
    • restlessness, retching and abdominal swelling in large breed dogs
    • You see symptoms of heatstroke.
    • Refusing to eat or drink for more than 24 hours.
    • Your pregnant dog or cat has gone more than three to four hours between delivering puppies or kittens.

Most important, remember to trust your instincts. You know and love your pet, and you have the right to be worried if something seems wrong.


Kidney Disease

Have you noticed your cat drinking more than usual?

Chronic kidney disease in cats is the most common disease process of middle age and elderly cats.  Did you know that kidney disease can be genetic?  This disease runs in certain lines or families of cats and as such has a strong genetic predisposition.   Although there is no cure per se , if diagnosed early, we can help slow the progression of the disease .  Cats compensate for this disease very well. They will typically not show significant signs of illness in the early stages.   Wondering how you can tell if your kitty has the beginning of kidney disease?   You are the one that can help make a difference.   Some of the signs to look for are:

  • Increase in water consumption
  • Increase in urination
  • Decrease in appetite
  • Lethargy
  • vomiting

Early detection is the best defense.  As your pets owner it is critical role determining if your pets behavior has changed.  The daily interaction that you have allows you to notice the subtle sign before they turn into a larger problem.  If you notice any of the above it is a good idea to have your pet screened  by the veterinarian.   We recommended: a complete blood count (CBC), a serum biochemical profile, and a urinalysis.

Unfortunately, once we see a rise in waste products in the blood there is an indication that the filtering mechanism of the kidney has been damaged.   In the urinalysis we test for pH, specific gravity, the presence of blood, protein, glucose, bilirubin, and ketones, and microscopically look for cells, bacteria, crystals, and casts.  These give us an understanding what is happening within the body.

There are multiple treatment options that we can use to delay the further damage to the kidneys.  The mainstay for therapy has been renal (kidney) diets. These diets are modified protein diets. If you pet has excessive protein consumption that can increase  nitrogenous waste in the body, which in turn, increases the burden on the kidney to remove it.

The best plan of action would be to be alert in changes that your pet may be exhibiting.  This will allow us to help you give you more quality time with your loved one.